www.new-england-rail-trails.org

East Bay Bike Path

Paved - open for public use

Supplementary Information

Historic Railroad Mileage Chart

Miles*

Station Name

Municipality

0 Providence  
2 East Providence
(India Point)
 
3.5 Gulf  
4 Vue de L'Eau
(Kettle Point)
 
4.5 Squantum  
5. Silver Spring  
5.5 Ponham  
6 Riverside  
6.5 Bullocks Point  
7 Drownville
(Crescent Park)
 
7.5 West Barrington  
8.5 Nayatt  
10 Barrington  
10.5 Hampden Meadows  
11 North Warren  
11.5 Warren  
12 South Warren  
13.5 Beach Terrace  
14 Bristol Highlands  
15 Poppasquash Rd  
16 Bristol  

Italics = not part of Rail-trail

Warren Bike Path

MA Border to East Bay Bike Path in Warren - 2 miles - unimproved RR Right-of-way.

A portion of this right-of-way may still be privately owned!

Historic Railroad Mileage Chart

Miles

Station Name

Municipality

0 Warren, RI  
0.5 East Warren, RI  
2 [State Line]  
3 Touisset, MA  
3.5 Ocean Grove  
4 South Swansea  
7 Brayton  
8 Fall River, MA  

Italics = not part of Rail-trail
[brackets] = point added by Webmaster

Mileage charts from article #26 of The Rail Lines of Southern New England by Ronald Dale Karr, published by Branch Line Press in 1995

The East Bay Bike Path is a trail that has been open for use for 14 years. It is well maintained and well used.

<Sue Barker [sueb4@home.com] April 19, 2001 9:24 AM>

The following sections of Rail-trail will be part of an alternate route of the East Coast Greenway, a multi-use trail that is planned from Maine to Florida:

The East Coast Greenway has recently been selected as one of 15 trails for designation as a Millenium Trail, which should be very helpful in focusing public attention on all of the component trail projects.

Repairs to the East Bay Bike Path

Current information is posted to the Bike RI Construction Update Web Page at the RI-DOT Web Site! 

Connections to other Rail-trails:

The East Bay Bike Path ends at India Point Park where it connects directly to the temporary On-Road Bike Route for the Blackstone River Bikeway.

There is no temporary On-Road Bike Route to the beginning of the Cranston Greenway (part of the Washington Secondary Bicycle Path). However, the following Rhode Island Public Transit Authority Bus routes can be used to leapfrog the gap that begins at from the East Street Pedestrian overpass of I-195 to India Point Park:

Books about the Trail:

A 14.5 mile section of the Trail from East Providence (Riverside) to Bristol (Independence Park) is described in section 23 of  the Official Rails-to-Trails Conservancy New England Guidebook by Cynthia Mascott published in 2000 by Globe Pequot Press. This trail listing contains a photograph, historical description, trail head directions and parking, a trail map, trail details, a local trail manager contact, and much more. 

The East Bay Bike Path is described in Great Rail Trails of the Northeast by Craig Della Penna. The information includes a historical background of the trail as well as a detailed description keyed to bicycle odometer readings from the author's in person trip down the trail. This book is out-of-print, but many bookstores still have copies for sale.

Intercity Transportation Connections at Providence

See the corresponding section for the Washington Secondary Bicycle Path.

 Local transit to the rail-trail

Newspaper articles about the Trail

Railroad Abandonment Summary

Item From To Year RR Miles
69 Brayton MA Fall River MA 1932 NH

1.5

108 East Warren Brayton, MA 1937 NH

6.3

149

at Bristol

1939 NH

0.5

301 Bristol Warren 1973 PC 4.0
313A East Providence Warren 1981 P&W 9.6
NH = New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad
PC=PennCentral RR
P&W = Providence & Worcester Railroad

From the "Directory of Rail Abandonments 1848-1994" in the book Lost Railroads of New England, 2nd Ed. by Ronald Dale Karr, published by Branch Line Press in 1996.

Railroad History

A brief history of the Providence, Warren & Bristol RR was published as article #26 in The Rail Lines of Southern New England by Ronald Dale Karr, published by Branch Line Press in 1995.


Sign images are from the Manual of Traffic Signs by Richard C. Moeur.

Updated on August 07, 2001 by Kenyon F. Karl <Webmaster@new-england-rail-trails.org>.
  Unintentional errors are likely!

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